Kansas has released its phased approach for administering COVID-19 vaccines. Learn more in English or Español.

About the COVID-19 Vaccine

Many questions come with the development of the COVID-19 vaccine. Below, KHF has tried to answer some of those questions to make people more familiar with the science, distribution and rationale behind the vaccine.

OVERVIEW

Since the beginning of the pandemic, health experts have pointed to a vaccine as the major turning point for returning lives to some sense of normalcy. Yet, with this development has come many valid questions. Below, KHF has attempted to share answers to many of these questions. Much of this material comes from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

For these and additional questions, please see KHF’s Vaccine Handout.

WHAT IS A VACCINE?
At its most basic, a vaccine is a shot given to prevent illnesses before they occur. According to the CDC, a vaccine “stimulates your immune system to produce antibodies, exactly like it would if you were exposed to the disease. After getting vaccinated, you develop immunity to that disease, without having to get the disease first.”

IS THERE A VACCINE FOR COVID-19?
On December 11, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued the first emergency use authorization (EUA) for a vaccine for the prevention of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

There are currently two vaccines approved, each requiring two doses:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech: 2 doses given 21 days apart
  • Moderna: 2 doses given 28 days apart

WHAT’S DIFFERENT ABOUT THESE VACCINES?
Both of the current vaccines utilize what is known as mRNA technology. The use of mRNA is new to vaccines and does not utilize any of the live virus. Instead, according to the CDC, these vaccines “teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.” The CDC says the COVID-19 vaccines cannot make you sick with COVID-19, because they do not contain the live virus that causes the disease.

More information about this new type of vaccine can be found here.

WHEN DOES THE VACCINE START WORKING?

The CDC indicates “it typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity (protection against the virus that causes COVID-19) after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and still get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.”

ARE THERE SIDE EFFECTS?
The most common side effects in clinical trials were like the flu shot: pain or redness at the injection site, fever, headache, chills, muscle and joint pain. Most happened after the second dose.

WHEN AND WHERE WILL I GET A VACCINE?
According to KDHE, “initially will be available in very limited doses, so planning efforts are based on three phases of availability. As availability increases, vaccines will be opened up to all Kansans and distributed at convenient locations.”

You can learn from KDHE here, and see a chart showing the phased approach to vaccines here.

HOW MUCH WILL THE VACCINES COST?
The shot is free, but some health care providers might charge an administration fee, which likely will be covered by your public or private insurance or for the uninsured. Health officials say no one will be turned away because of inability to pay.

IF I HAVE ALREADY HAD COVID-19 AND RECOVERED, DO I NEED TO GET A VACCINE?

The CDC indicates the COVID-19 vaccination should be offered to you regardless of whether you already had COVID-19 infection. Evidence suggests reinfection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is uncommon in the 90 days after initial infection. Therefore, people with a recent infection may delay vaccination until the end of that 90-day period if desired.

WHERE CAN I LEARN MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE VACCINE?
There are many accurate and trusted information sources to learn more about the vaccine and its distribution. Below are several sources providing either a general or state-based perspective.

  • KDHE provides weekly vaccine updates on its website, coronavirus.kdheks.gov.
  • Vaccine information specific to Kansas can be found at kansasvaccine.gov.
  • Comprehensive vaccine information, provided by the CDC, can be found here.

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